Fuel Consumption

CUSTOMER CARE.

Fuel Consumption.

How does the NEDC work?

The NEDC is based on a theoretical driving profile and consists of two parts. In the first 13 minutes, it simulates a drive in city traffic with many stop-and-go phases. The second part corresponds to an extra-urban journey at a maximum speed of 120 km/h (almost 75 mph).

What does the NEDC measure?

The NEDC is an artificial laboratory test that helps compare the fuel consumption of vehicles, without reflecting the fuel consumption of day-to-day driving.
 
Actual consumption today is often very different from the NEDC information. The main reasons include:
 
•    The theoretical driving profiles NEDC uses don’t match real user profiles
•    Insufficient acceleration
•    Too many stop-and-go phases
•    NEDC doesn’t incorporate higher speeds, which sets the average speed too low
•    Gear shifting points are broadly defined by transmission type, so they're the same for all cars with manual transmission
•    Optional equipment isn't taken into account

What's the difference between NEDC and WLTP?

•    Longer cycle times (30 min v. 20 min)
•    Shorter stopping times (13% v. 25%)
•    Longer distances (about 23 km/14 miles v. 11 km/6 miles)
•    Higher speeds (maximum 130 km/h or 80 mph vs 120 km/h or 75 mph)
•    Almost 50% higher average speeds
•    Higher maximum acceleration and more acceleration phases
•    Approximately 20-30% higher driving power, based on the more dynamic driving situations
•    More realistic calculation of driving resistance for fuel consumption tests
•    Consideration of optional equipment in the vehicle
 
The values obtained with WLTP are comparable worldwide, while the NEDC values are only valid in Europe.

What is the worldwide harmonized light vehicles test procedure (WLTP)?

To work out fuel consumption more realistically, the Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicle Test Procedure (WLTP) driving cycle is based on a global statistical survey of real driving profiles.
 
It includes four parts with different average speeds: low, medium, high and extra-high. Each phase includes different amounts and degrees of acceleration, braking and stopping - all to stimulate everyday driving.

Why is the NEDC out of date?

The NEDC (New European Driving Cycle) was introduced in 1992. Since that time, cars, roads and driving behaviour have changed quite a bit. It's an artificial laboratory test that helps compare vehicles, without reflecting day-to-day driving and fuel consumption.
 
Actual consumption today is often very different from the NEDC information. The main reasons include:
 
•    The theoretical driving profiles NEDC uses don’t match real user profiles
•    Insufficient acceleration
•    Too many stop-and-go phases
•    NEDC doesn’t incorporate higher speeds, which sets the average speed too low
•    Gear shifting points are broadly defined by transmission type, so they're the same for all cars with manual transmission
•    Optional equipment isn't taken into account

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